What's On WCRB This Week

Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Godowsky's Vision of Bach, with Alessio Bax

This week on The Bach Hour, Alessio Bax plays piano transcriptions of some of Bach's most beloved works.

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On the latest episode of The Answered Question, conductor Bramwell Tovey looks at works by Samuel Barber, Terry Riley, and Edward Elgar - all on his January 2017 Boston Symphony Orchestra program - from the perspective of a composer, and, in a 2014 interview, Murray Perahia describes the magnetic pull of music by Robert Schumann..

This Week's CD of the Week

Lars Vogt: Schubert
Ondine

In an all-Schubert program, the German pianist performs three of the composer’s more intimate works for solo piano.

WCRB Blog

As 2016 ends and 2017 begins, let's look (and listen) back to some of the best concerts of the year.

Each week, we highlight a new release from the classical world - see which albums from 2016 each member of the WCRB team loved the most!

Composer Ludwig van Beethoven
Wikimedia Commons

Over the past few weeks I have been blissfully “nerding out” to The Beethoven Compendium, an in-depth, all-encompassing Beethoven biographyIt’s a deep dive into what we know about the man, his daily habits, his influences, and what made him tick. 

Tanglewood 2017

Nov 17, 2016
Tanglewood
Stu Rosner / BSO

The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced the schedule for the 2017 Tanglewood season, in which Music Director Andris Nelsons leads 10 concerts over several weeks that begin and end the season, and Artistic Partner Thomas Adès conducts his own music with both the BSO and the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. 

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What's On Now

From NPR Music

Ennio Morricone is as about close as a film composer can come to being a household name — and, at age 88, he's still going strong. This year, he was signed to a new record label and has now released a new recording, Morricone 60, named for the number of years he's been in the business.

Jazz great Wynton Marsalis, a virtuoso trumpet player and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, has written — wait for it — a violin concerto.

As the daughter of the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, I was intrigued and wanted to know more. So I spent an hour with Marsalis — and the violinist he wrote his concerto with and for. (More on that later.)

Do you believe in ghosts? The age-old question pops up this time of year when Halloween looms — the answer for opera composers seems to be a resounding "yes." Many of them, from Mozart to Corigliano, have given ghosts a few choice moments on stage. Operatic apparitions arrive suddenly in the middle of the night, crash dinner parties or do their ghostly duty simply by playing tricks on the minds of the living.