From the Top, October 16, 2016
courtesy of the program

For over 20 years, NPR's "From the Top" and host Christopher O'Riley have infused classical music with the boundless energy of youth. That energy took the stage at New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall in October, with musicians from Boston and beyond.

What's On WCRB This Week

Stu Rosner

Handel's "Saul," from the Handel and Haydn Society

Harry Christophers conducts a masterpiece by Handel at Symphony Hall in Boston, on-demand, on WCRB In Concert.
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Dictionary text: ABC
Image via (Public Domain)

Last week on the daily trivia question, we dove head-first into definitions: why is it called the "Head" of the Charles? What's a paralipsis? The answers to those and more, in this week's trivia recap.

Portrait by E.G. Hausmann / Wikimedia Commons

This concert season brings a rare Bach convergence. I dare you to take advantage of it.

Did you miss any of the daily trivia questions this week? Not to worry: they're all right here!

The daily trivia question airs every weekday at 5:30pm on 99.5 WCRB.

Friday, October 14th is National Dessert Day. I thought this merited further investigation. Took one for the team, as it were. Someone had to do it. My no-spoon-unturned investigation found that October is also National Desserts Month---a time when we simply must give these "grand finales" the due they deserve.  With that in mind, here are some sweet musical suggestions to chew on.

More from the Blog

This Week's CD of the Week

Fazil Say: Mozart: Complete Piano Sonatas
Warner Classics

The Turkish pianist curates a unique narrative of Mozart’s complete piano sonata repertoire.

What's On Now

From NPR Music

In a season of relentless shouting, the best antidote might be singing. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato's new album with conductor Maxim Emelyanychev and the ensemble Il Pomo d'Oro, In War & Peace: Harmony Through Music, uses Baroque arias to explore the pain and possibilities of these troubled times. A companion website invites anyone and everyone to answer the simple but loaded question, "In the midst of chaos, how do you find peace?"

Christopher Rouse's Symphony No. 3, which appears on his latest album, contains many levels of meaning. It's an homage to the Russian composer Sergey Prokofiev, whose Second Symphony serves as a structural model for the piece. It's an encoded musical portrait of Rouse's wife. And it's an engaging piece of music even for a listener who possesses none of this background knowledge.

Brian Eno. David Bowie. Kraftwerk. Radiohead. Aphex Twin. The National. These are just some of the contemporary artists and bands who have looked up to American composer Steve Reich.

Neville Marriner, the conductor and violinist who was something of an entrepreneur as well as the guiding spirit behind one of the most successful classical recordings of all time — the soundtrack to the 1984 smash movie Amadeus — died overnight at age 92 at his home in London. His death was announced by the chamber orchestra he founded, the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields.

If the viola is your instrument, it can be difficult to find repertoire to showcase your talent. But violist Nadia Sirota has plenty to play. She champions new composers to write music for her and forms ensembles to play it. Sirota's longtime collaborator Nico Muhly recently released an album called Keep in Touch, featuring two pieces written specifically for her.