From the Top, October 16, 2016
courtesy of the program

For over 20 years, NPR's "From the Top" and host Christopher O'Riley have infused classical music with the boundless energy of youth. That energy took the stage at New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall in October, with musicians from Boston and beyond.

What's On WCRB This Week

Charles Dutoit
Priska Ketterer

Dutoit Conducts Mozart and Bartók

Saturday at 8pm, Charles Dutoit leads the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Mozart's exuberant Symphony No. 39, and Matthias Goerne sings the title role in Bartók's reflection of the dark side of humanity, "Bluebeard's Castle."
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This Week's CD of the Week

Fazil Say: Mozart: Complete Piano Sonatas
Warner Classics

The Turkish pianist curates a unique narrative of Mozart’s complete piano sonata repertoire.


About two years ago, we invited the Boston Conservatory to collaborate on a vital project for any radio station: those tiny moments of music that say, "you're listening to WCRB!" We call them "sounders," and here's how they came together.

Dictionary text: ABC
Image via (Public Domain)

Last week on the daily trivia question, we dove head-first into definitions: why is it called the "Head" of the Charles? What's a paralipsis? The answers to those and more, in this week's trivia recap.

Portrait by E.G. Hausmann / Wikimedia Commons

This concert season brings a rare Bach convergence. I dare you to take advantage of it.

Did you miss any of the daily trivia questions this week? Not to worry: they're all right here!

The daily trivia question airs every weekday at 5:30pm on 99.5 WCRB.

More from the Blog

What's On Now

From NPR Music

Do you believe in ghosts? The age-old question pops up this time of year when Halloween looms — the answer for opera composers seems to be a resounding "yes." Many of them, from Mozart to Corigliano, have given ghosts a few choice moments on stage. Operatic apparitions arrive suddenly in the middle of the night, crash dinner parties or do their ghostly duty simply by playing tricks on the minds of the living.

What are you doing for the next 10 days? That's how long it would take, without sleep, to listen to the new Mozart edition. The mammoth set, which some are touting as the biggest box set ever, claims to hold every note of Mozart's music and then some.

In a season of relentless shouting, the best antidote might be singing. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato's new album with conductor Maxim Emelyanychev and the ensemble Il Pomo d'Oro, In War & Peace: Harmony Through Music, uses Baroque arias to explore the pain and possibilities of these troubled times. A companion website invites anyone and everyone to answer the simple but loaded question, "In the midst of chaos, how do you find peace?"

Christopher Rouse's Symphony No. 3, which appears on his latest album, contains many levels of meaning. It's an homage to the Russian composer Sergey Prokofiev, whose Second Symphony serves as a structural model for the piece. It's an encoded musical portrait of Rouse's wife. And it's an engaging piece of music even for a listener who possesses none of this background knowledge.

Brian Eno. David Bowie. Kraftwerk. Radiohead. Aphex Twin. The National. These are just some of the contemporary artists and bands who have looked up to American composer Steve Reich.