The Bach Hour

Sundays 6-7am, Mondays midnight-2am

The virtually limitless well of music by J.S. Bach has always had a prominent place on radio airwaves in Boston. Whether it’s an iconic work like the Toccata and Fugue in D minor or a rarely heard but emotionally riveting church cantata, Bach’s music is a touchstone, returning listeners to a foundation on which so much subsequent music has been built.

Hear The Bach Hour each Sunday at 6am on 99.5 WCRB.

Ben Ealovega, courtesy Decca

Bach never wrote an opera, but the drama and storytelling in his cantatas often has an operatic quality. Hear that drama this week on The Bach Hour.

On the program:

Arioso, from Keyboard Concerto No. 5 in F minor, BWV 1056 (arr. Alfred Cortot) - Stephen Hough, piano

Cantata BWV 126 Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort (translation) - Robin Tyson, alto;  James Gilchrist, tenor;  Stephan Loges, bass;  Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists, John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F, BWV 1046 - Les Concert des Nations, Jordi Savall, director

Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 (arr. Alfred Cortot) - Stephen Hough, piano

Maxim Rysanov
Laszlo Emmer

Maxim Rysanov writes in the liner notes for his Bach Cello Suites CD, "playing Bach is like confessing, letting myself free, opening myself to someone I trust in." Hear it this week on The Bach Hour.

statue of J.S. Bach in Leipzig
Max Pixel, CC0 1.0

One of the rewards of great art is finding meaning below the surface. The first four notes of an aria on this week's "Bach Hour" are designed not just to sound nice, but to carry a message.

Murray Perahia
Nana Watanabe

"Vivid, but not overdone." "Good taste and musical insight." Critics have a lot to say about Murray Perahia's interpretations of Bach - and with good reason. His playing rewards a close attention to subtle details. Hear it this week on The Bach Hour.

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