Kendall Todd

Production Assistant

Kendall Todd grew up in San Diego, California, and is asked every day why she left. She is a graduate of Tufts University with degrees in French and International Relations. Her interest in music began at age 7, when she went to a Christmas pops concert and got to hold a violin in an instrument petting zoo; she fell in love, and the rest is history. She played in the San Diego Youth Symphony and the Tufts Symphony Orchestra, and especially enjoys being in string quartets. Outside of classical music, her hobbies include arguing about politics, binge-listening to history or science podcasts, and trying every locally-owned coffee shop in the Greater Boston Area. At WCRB, she does a little bit of everything, from behind-the-scenes tasks to filling in for current hosts.

This week: a robot conductor, a crisis coolly averted, and Neil deGrasse Tyson. Need I say more?

This week's link roundup has it all: classical celebrity couples, Star Trek, bagpipes, a murder mystery... check out what happened this week on the classical internet. 

As one of the social media editors here at WCRB, I spend a lot of time trawling the web for cool articles and videos to share on our Facebook and Twitter accounts in addition to posts about our own programming. There is a lot of content out there, and only a few things actually end up getting posted each week. So, starting today, I'll share with you a weekly roundup of fun, weird, and just plain interesting things that you might not have seen before, from all corners of the classical internet.

This Labor Day Weekend, WCRB is celebrating the alphabet of composers with an A to Z weekend - a piece by a composer whose name starts with A, then B, and so on through Z, more than 10 times throughout Labor Day Weekend.

Leonard Bernstein at the Berlin Wall, 1989
Andreas Meyer-Schwickerath

When I listen to Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, I wonder if he had any idea how the central words of the chorus would be taken up as a rallying cry, right at the apex of history, more than a hundred years after he set them to music.

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