#BachBostonMass

Martin Pearlman
Susan Wilson

January 28, 2018
7:00 PM

WCRB In Concert with Boston Baroque features a work that encompasses the full range of J.S. Bach's musical genius and his desire for a legacy that would outlive him, led by Martin Pearlman.

Bach's B minor x 4

Mar 2, 2017
clockwise, from upper right: portrait by E.G. Haussmann (1748); portrait by J.E. Rentsch (c. 1715); statue by C. Seffner (1908); forensic reconstruction by Caroline Wilkinson (2008)
Wikimedia Commons

Last weekend I spent a lot of time with Bach. Over the last four and a half months, I’ve spent a lot of time with Bach. “But you produce a show called The Bach Hour. Of course you’ve spent a lot of time with Bach!”

 

Yes, well, there is that. But this has been exceptional. Being at four different performances of Bach’s Mass in B minor since October has left me with two takeaways, one of them expected, the other unexpected. Neither takeaway is the, dare I say, cliché, “I heard things in the Mass I had never heard before.”

courtesy of Cantata Singers

David Hoose, the conductor of Boston's Cantata Singers, joins Brian McCreath for an in-depth look at J.S. Bach's Mass in B minor, featuring a performance with the Leipzig Radio Choir, Staatskapelle Dresden, and conductor Peter Schreier.

For more about the Mass in B minor, visit the Oregon Bach Festival's Digital Bach Project.

Andris Nelsons
Marco Borggreve

February 13

Andris Nelsons, conductor
Malin Christensson, soprano
Christine Rice, mezzo-soprano
Benjamin Bruns, tenor
Hanno Müller-Brachmann, bass-baritone
Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

Bach - Mass in B minor

Hear the concert on demand.

manuscript of the Kyrie of Bach's Mass in B minor
Wikimedia Commons

When we learned that the 2016-2017 concert season in Boston would include no fewer than four major presentations of J.S. Bach’s Mass in B minor, it seemed almost like too much of a good thing. Almost.

In fact, the opposite has been true, from my perspective anyway. After two of those four performances, the familiarity of the music isn’t what stands out to me. It’s the vast differences in approach that make each performance a new event.

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