Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Petr Kratochvil

The year was 1788. Thomas Jefferson, nearing the end of his post as the Ambassador to France, spent his days wandering the streets of Paris, attending concerts and the theater, and combing through bookshops in search of any volumes that would be pertinent to the fledgling United States of America.

In Vienna, Austria, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart churned out more than 40 compositions, including the three symphonies that would be his last - numbers 39, 40, and 41.

And across the ocean, as more and more states ratified the U.S. Constitution, General George Washington began the campaign that resulted in his unanimous election as the new nation's first president.

Piotr Anderszewski:  Mozart - Schumann: Fantasies
Parlophone/Warner Classics

"I can hear in the music of both composers a similarity in their processes of giving physical form to their inspirations. The cruel resistance of the blank page feels, in both cases, inexistent, ignored. And therein lies an important, precious connection between Mozart and Schumann: an unobstructed directness to their music, in which the purity of intention remains intact." -Piotr Anderszewski

We play a lot of Mozart on WCRB, and for good reason. Though he's getting a little up there in years - his 261st birthday would be this Friday, January 27 - there are still so many wonderful performances and recordings of Mozart's music that prove it is just as relevant, timeless, and powerful as ever. In fact, 2016 was an all-around great year for the Austrian maestro (his CD sales are evidence enough of that).

Adaskin String Trio/Ensemble Schumann: Mozart: Chamber Music for Strings, Oboe, and Piano
MSR Classics

The Adaskin String Trio teams up with Ensemble Schumann in three of Mozart's chamber works.

Steinway & Sons

The pianist designs a concept album for children, evoking the fondest memories of her own childhood.

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